RACE REVIEW: THE MARINE CORPS MARATHON

Despite apprehension over the approach of Hurricane Sandy, a record field of 23,864 runners set off on October 28th for the 37th Marine Corps Marathon, and were treated to near-perfect race conditions, with temperatures in the low 50s under cloudy skies.

It seems to be a tradition for the Marine Corps Marathon to tweak and change the marathon almost every year, and 2012 proved to be no different. After enjoying beautiful views of the Potomac River on Spout Run Parkway in Arlington and River Road in DC, runners threaded through Georgetown on their way to the National Mall, but they might have been surprised to find that they would not be running on Constitution Avenue. Instead, they wove their way along the Mall, still finding their way to the west front of the Capitol. Then, after crossing into Virginia, the course avoided the out-and-back course through Crystal City, and instead opted for a loop route. While some runners seemed to miss the old route, I was happy to avoid the drive-way turn-around that used to be part of this section.

There were welcome changes to the end of the race at the iconic Iwo Jima Memorial as well: the finish line was moved up, relieving congestion that proved to be challenging at last year’s race. And upon completing the race, participants not only received their medal, but also got a disposable jacket, which was a welcome bit of schwag as the temperatures began to drop.

By nightfall, the rain had begun. While Sandy didn’t wreak as much havoc in the area as had been feared, it still reminded us what a difference 24 hours could make. If it’s true, as Vince Lombardi reportedly said, that luck is a combination of preparation and opportunity, then the Marine Corps Marathon made the very most of the hand that it was dealt, to the benefit of everyone who came out to participate.

Advertisements

About horowitzrun

Jeff is a certified running, cycling, and triathlon coach, and is the author of "My First 100 Marathons" (Skyhorse Press 2008) and "Smart Marathon Training" (Velo Press 2011). An obviously addicted runner, Jeff has run at least one marathon in every state and on 6 continents, including marathons in South Africa, China, Bangkok, and Antarctica. Jeff is available for group, one-on-one, and virtual coaching. Options include: 1. Basic Training Plan. This includes a customized training schedule geared towards a goal race, with a detailed running schedule that would include all distances and target times for each workout, including speedwork, tempo, and endurance sessions. 2. Complete Fitness and Race Plan. This includes the plan listed above, plus the non-running workouts and drills that runners need for better overall fitness and performance. You would get strength & core workouts, as well as run-specific training drills and stretches. 3. Virtual Coaching. This includes all of the above, implemented on a week-by-week basis. We review each week's progress at week's end so that adjustments can be made. The program is tailored to suit you right up to race day. It involves more contact, on a weekly or even daily basis. 4. Full Coaching for athletes in the Washington DC area. All of the above, plus a weekly workout together including speedwork, drills, and strength training. 5. Individual track sessions. One-on-one track-based workouts. Contact Jeff for pricing.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to RACE REVIEW: THE MARINE CORPS MARATHON

  1. Renata says:

    Very nice account. Loved reading it. I went to GT to watch a friend. I wish I had known you were running so I could be on the look out for you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s